Archive for February, 2012

Advertising for 3 Phases of Consumer Behavior

Published by admin on February 24th, 2012

 

Everything I know about Relational and Transactional customers, I learned from Roy H. Williams, founder of the Wizard Academy  and the those terms should be properly credited to him.   My friend and former co-worker Josh Yudin, president of The Marketing Academy, an Atlanta-based consulting firm, assigned a new meaning to those terms as different modes of consumer behavior in general.   It has occurred to me, however, that there is a 3rd phase, Transitional, that incorporates both the general ethos of Relational or Transactional buyers, and buyer behavior through the sales cycle of any give product or service.  That said…

There are three phases of buyer behavior:

Relational, Transitional,  and Transactional

Relational: The phase customers are in before the need arises for your product. 95-98% of your target. The longer the sales cycle (HVAC, jewelry, cars once every few years, vs. say a restaurant, grocery store, gasoline, etc.), the longer a customer is in Relational phase

Transitional: After an event occurs to move them into the sales funnel (anything from the everyday mundane events like “I’m hungry” to paradigm shifting life events like “my mother broke her hip and now she can’t live alone”). The length of time a customer stays in Transitional mode depends on a number of factors like personality types,  immediacy of solution needed, amount of expense, resources available, etc.

Transactional: After the consumer has had what my friend calls the “Popeye moment” (as in, “I can’t stands no more!”). They’ve done any necessary research and they are ready to pull the trigger on a purchase.The immediate sales funnel. That 2-5% of your target customer that is ready to buy today.

  •  Each phase requires different advertising strategy.  One could argue for exceptions, but generally speaking, it works something like this.

Media Strategy for Each:

Relational Strategy: The “Why”.   Persuade with emotions. Authentically enroll people with the “why” of your company. Details and facts are irrelevant in relational mode because they are not yet in the market for your product.   While emotions can be conveyed in any medium, the human brain is uniquely wired for processing the human voice, thus making intrusive, sound-based media like Radio and TV a prudent choice for not only arresting the attention of an audience, but also telling the “why” story of your company in an emotionally compelling way.

Transitional Strategy:  The “How”.  An event has occurred in the customers life and they are looking for possible options to solve their problem. Articles and blog entries on your site found through a solid SEO strategy.   Social Media conversations on  Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest, etc.  Behavioral Retargeting is becoming more and more effective advertising tool in transitional phase. 

Transactional Strategy: The “Who, What, Where”.    They are ready to buy and they are looking for the details necessary to complete the transaction.  SEM (Pay Per Click) used correctly is a very effective tool in the Transactional phase.  Feedback sites like  Yelp, Angie’s List, Kudzu etc. are also becoming more and more important.  In certain cases print media can allow  a more comprehensive format to fill in the details and facts necessary to complete the transaction.  Search has a distinct advantage in that tools like Google Analytics allow advertisers to track metrics and provide reams of data that print media cannot (save tools like QR codes).

Trying to connect emotionally when consumers are in Transactional mode is too late.  Filling ads with details in Relational mode is too premature.

For more information, email me.


6 Quick Steps to Less Sucky Radio Ads (or any ads)

Published by admin on February 23rd, 2012

People don’t “hate advertising”.  Quite the contrary.  How many times have you forwarded a funny commercial or mentioned a clever ad to someone.  Multiple times.  No, we don’t hate advertising…we hate advertising that sucks.  Flacid, boring blah blah blah, and frankly most local radio ad copy sucks.  Heck, most local copy sucks, period.  Hate to be crude, but…it’s true.   However, ask those local advertisers who’ve built an empire on radio, those who you hear year after year? They’d tell you a different story.  So what’s the difference between sucky radio copy and not sucky radio copy?

 

 

Follow these 6 simple rules:

1) Arrest the attention: I had a well respected agency tell me once that she needed to “set the stage” before saying something significant.  The hell you do.  You don’t have time. You have 3 seconds for the brain to assess your message and either be intrigued enough to listen further, or kick it to the curb.  3 seconds. Between texting, talking, glancing at a GPS or whatever it’s a wonder anyone ever hears your ad.  Arrest their attention first. Not screaming like a car dealer, but by saying something out of left field for effect, then tie it back to the point you are trying to get across.    Email me, and I can show you several examples or even take your ad and do it for you if you are interested.

2) Ditch the details:  Tell an authentic, interesting story instead. There was a time when details may have mattered in radio ads.  That time dies with this thing called Google. We don’t have to remember details…about anything.  Google’s got it. Details are only important to those who are already in the market for a product, and 98% of those who hear it are not yet in the market. Your short :30 or :60 is too precious to spat details that are not important right now.  Let the details, (the who, what, when, and where,) be the domain of your website, blog, and search strategy, because when they do fall into the cue, they will search.  Tell of the story of the impact your product or service had on someone.  Make it interesting, and make it real.  To paraphrase Simon Sinek, “people don’t by what you do, they buy why you do it”.  Give them the why.  Tell them your story.

3) Crush the cliche’ catchphrase:  Seems so obvious, but there are scores of ads running right now, in my top 10 market touting “There’s never been a better time to buy a _________”, or “Everything must go!”, or “Family owned and operated since19__”.  If you’ve hear it before, your brain has too…and your brain knows better.  Broca’s area swats irrelevant cliches like mosquitoes.   Listeners never hear it.  Ever.   There are so many fun, persuasive, and effective ways to say what you are trying to get across without resorting to this.  It just takes a little imagination.  Email me and I’ll show you some great examples.

4) Abandon the obvious:  Heard this one the other day…”Hey Atlanta, it’s about to be springtime! Time to take off those unwanted pounds”  Really?? I hadn’t noticed.  And who’s this “Atlanta” character, anyway.   Just by looking through a different prism we can come up with many different, more interesting angles.   Once again, Broca’s area of the brain anticipates the predictable and banishes it to the scrap heap of irrelevancy.  Take a unique angle.  If you need inspiration, look no further than the fabulous “2o Something Betters” scene from the 1987 classic “Roxanne”.

5) Be Real:  We live in a jaded, over-sold world.  Our bullsh*t trigger fires at the slightest inkling of “being sold”.  Don’t use a polished “voice talent” from a station. In this age of authenticity, nothing is more hokey than a staged radio voice.  Be real with your ads.  Use real voices.  Speak in broken sentences.  Shed the sheen of a smooth sounding ad.  Your listeners are going to relate much more to an interesting story told in an authentic way than some slick talking DJ voice spatting the same old tired manure.

6) Give up the quest for magic beans:  So many advertisers want to hear that we have the magic beans….that we’re the station that “gets results”.  Unfortunately too many sales reps have told them about “their station” as if a mass media audience has some magical predilection to buy the advertisers product that other audiences don’t have.  While  some stations are more credible than others in the marketplace to be sure, at the end of the day Radio (or TV, or any other mass medium) aggregates people.  That’s it.  That’s all they do.  What you say and how frequently you say it separates success from failure, period.  There are no magic beans. Focus on interesting, story-based copy.   I can help you do that.


Beware the Danger of Data

Published by admin on February 16th, 2012

I love data.  Analyzing more efficient ways to get more customers to my clients’ websites and businesses by any and every metric there is is an obsession.  Monitoring CRM sales data, site traffic, search metrics and social media can enhance and improve your marketing efforts….that is, until it doesn’t. The truth is, as much as I lean on it, the dark side of data is that it can lead you to conclusions that are counter to your intuition, particularly when you’re dealing with human beings. 

“When dealing with people, let us remember, we are not dealing with creatures of logic.  We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.” – Dale Carnegie

We are emotional creatures ultimately motivated by avoiding pain or seeking pleasure. Moreover,  anticipated pain or pleasure is often as powerful a motivator as the experience itself. Logic is only used to justify what our emotions have already deciced. 

With few exceptions, we move in and out of a given sales cycles by events that happen in our lives, not by your website or your offer or by how many facebook fans “like” you.  A new baby, a blown tire, a change in jobs, an aging mother-in-law who breaks her hip.  These things happen and we search for a solution.   When you start talking about anything else, or get hyped about social media metrics because the “data shows” this or that, beware.  It’s why, while 59% of Facebookers  have “liked” a brand or company in the last 6 months, yet only 1% have engage with the brands on the site.  1%!  Social media has changed the platform on which we interact to be sure, but it hasn’t changed the motivations behind those interactions.  For all the snake oil being sold to get people to ”like” you on Facebook, or follow you on Twitter or Pinterest, your customers will go where anxiety is low. Helping them avoid pain or gain pleasure through great customer experience always wins the day.  

 Hey, I think I’ll tweet that…